What can I do?

 

Slowing, Scanning, and Spacing.

 

Crashes with pedestrians and bicyclists are almost always avoidable. All of us behind the wheel can drive2Bbetter by remembering the 3 S’s of safe driving.

 
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Slow down.

In NYS, nearly 30 percent of traffic fatalities list speeding as a contributing factor and that number is on the rise.  Speed enforcement is one method working to reverse this trend and reduce deaths and injuries due to crashes.

We all know that driving at or below the posted speed limit is one way to make our community safer, yet more than 50 percent of Monroe County drivers admit to frequently exceeding the speed limit. Driving at or below the speed limit provides drivers with more time to scan for bicyclists and pedestrians,  more time to stop, and more time to react to other drivers.

Even a small reduction in speed can dramatically reduce the risk of injury or death to pedestrians:

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at 40mph

only 1 out of 10 pedestrians survives
being hit by a vehicle.

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at 30mph

5 out of 10 pedestrians survive
being hit by a vehicle.

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at 20mph

9 out of 10 pedestrians survive
being hit by a vehicle.

 
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Scan for pedestrians and bicyclists.

Scan crosswalks and bike lanes for pedestrians and bicyclists. Scan when making right turns. Scan when backing out of parking spaces or when exiting driveways and parking lots.

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The bottom line: expect pedestrians when you are driving and scan constantly to ensure their safety (and yours).

Not sure when to stop for a pedestrian? NYS law makes it clear: When there is no traffic control signal, drivers must yield the right-of-way to pedestrians, whether or not a pedestrian is in a crosswalk, or if there is potential danger to the pedestrian.




 
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Give bicyclists at least 3 feet of Space.

NYS law stipulates that bicycles may legally be ridden in the roadway and have many of the same rights and rules as drivers, which means you can expect to be sharing driving lanes with bikes. Keep at least 3 free between your vehicle and a bicyclist when following or passing them.

The shared lane marking, or Sharrow, is used across our region to indicate areas where cyclists will be driving on the right-hand edge of the lane or driving in the full lane.

The shared lane marking, or Sharrow, is used across our region to indicate areas where cyclists will be driving on the right-hand edge of the lane or driving in the full lane.

Many roadways in our community feature marked bicycle lanes.  2 things to remember about bike lanes: - Don’t park there. - Don’t drive there.

Many roadways in our community feature marked bicycle lanes.

2 things to remember about bike lanes:
- Don’t park there.
- Don’t drive there.

Dooring 

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Ever heard of “dooring?”

Unfortunately, bicyclists know this risk very well. Dooring is a crash that happens when a driver opens his or her car door into the path of a cyclist. You can help reduce dooring crashes by practicing the ROC Reach — watch this video to learn how.


Common Sense Behaviors

  • Be alert — expect pedestrians.
  • Slow down and drive according to conditions.
  • Do not pass vehicles stopped at a crosswalk as they may have stopped for pedestrians to cross.
  • When yielding to a pedestrian (within or outside of a crosswalk) make eye contact to alert them you are aware of their presence.
  • Take time to back out of driveways and scan for pedestrians – they are especially vulnerable to drivers in reverse as visibility is limited.
  • Leave at least 3 feet of space between you and a cyclist.
  • Slow down when passing a bicyclist.
  • Don’t drive or park in bicycle lanes.
  • Look over your shoulder for cyclists before opening your door when parked on the street to avoid “dooring.” We call it the ROC Reach.
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